Methane leaks offset much of the climate change benefits of natural gas, study says

June 21, 2018 in the Washington Post

The U.S. oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of methane from its operations each year — nearly 60 percent more than current estimates and enough to offset much of the climate benefits of burning natural gas instead of coal, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.

 Natural gas burn off near oil pumps in Watford City, N.D. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Natural gas burn off near oil pumps in Watford City, N.D. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Gas leaks worse for climate than thought, study says

June 21, 2018 in Financial Times

Methane escapes exceeded US government estimates by about 60%

Leaks of methane from the US oil and gas industry are about 60 per cent higher than government estimates, new research has suggested, heightening concerns about their contribution to global warming.

 The scale of methane leakage from wells, processing plants and pipelines is central to the debate over switching from coal to gas for power generation © Bloomberg

The scale of methane leakage from wells, processing plants and pipelines is central to the debate over switching from coal to gas for power generation © Bloomberg

Research Findings Presented at Yale Symposium on State of ESG Data and Metrics

Macroclimate® — together with colleagues at Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment (IonE) and the climate data division of Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS-Ethix) — presented a collaborative research paper on the state-of-the-art in Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) data at a Yale University Symposium on September 22, 2017. The paper – A Geofinancial Engineering Initiative: Using Real Time Environmental Data from Satellites to Move Financial Markets and Improve Climate Outcomes – was published in the September issue of the Journal of Environmental Investing (pdf). A short online version of the article – Can geofinancial engineering get us out of hot water? – also appeared in Environmental Research Web, a climate science publication of IOP (UK's Institute of Physics).